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The Redesigning and Redefining Work Summit (RRW) is an INVITATION ONLY summit at Stanford University to present new and innovative research and generate dialog among diverse perspectives to create a new platform for the design and definition of work for the twenty-first century.  The RRW Summit will bring together one hundred and fifty top academic researchers, corporate leaders, policy makers, and media representatives to set a research-based agenda for redesigning work.
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Thursday, November 7
 

11:00am

Summit Check-In
Check-in for the Redesigning, Redefining Work Summit begins at 11:00am.  

Thursday November 7, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

11:30am

Start of Buffet Lunch
Thursday November 7, 2013 11:30am - 12:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

12:00pm

Welcome - President John L. Hennessy, Stanford University
Introductory Remarks
avatar for John L. Hennessy

John L. Hennessy

President, Stanford University
John L. Hennessy joined Stanford’s faculty in 1977 as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He rose through the academic ranks to full professorship in 1986 and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004. From 1983 to 1993, Dr. Hennessy was director of the Computer Systems Laboratory, a research and teaching center operated by the... Read More →

Thursday November 7, 2013 12:00pm - 12:10pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

12:10pm

Summit Purpose - Shelley J. Correll, Stanford University
Introductory Remarks
avatar for Shelley J. Correll

Shelley J. Correll

Professor of Sociology and Director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University
Shelley Correll is professor of sociology at Stanford University and the Barbara D. Finberg Director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research. Her expertise is in the areas of gender and workplace dynamics. Her recent research on “motherhood penalty” illustrates how stereotypic beliefs associated with motherhood influence the workplace evaluations and pay and hiring decisions of women when they give evidence of being a... Read More →

Thursday November 7, 2013 12:10pm - 12:25pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

12:30pm

Keynote: Alice Kessler-Harris, Columbia University - Trapped in the Past? A Historical View of American Workplace Policies
Alice Kessler-Harris in conversation with Andrea Rees Davies and Brenda Frink, on the history of work, place and time norms.

Keynote Speakers
avatar for Alice Kessler-Harris

Alice Kessler-Harris

R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History, Columbia University
Alice Kessler-Harris, R. Gordon Hoxie Professor of American History. She is also Professor in the Institute for Research on Women and Gender. Dr. Kessler-Harris specializes in the history of American labor and the comparative and interdisciplinary exploration of women and gender. She received her B. A. from Goucher College (1961) and her Ph.D. from Rutgers (1968). | | Her published works include: In Pursuit of Equity: Women, Men... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
AE

Ann Enthoven

Director, Programs and Research, The Clayman Institute for Gender Research

Thursday November 7, 2013 12:30pm - 2:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:00pm

Break
Thursday November 7, 2013 2:00pm - 2:15pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:15pm

Opening Plenary: Erin Kelly, University of Minnesota - Taking Stock: Flexible Work Arrangements and Future Directions
Plenary Speaker
avatar for Erin Kelly

Erin Kelly

Professor and Life Course Center Director, University of Minnesota
Erin L. Kelly is Professor and the Martindale Chair of Sociology at the University of Minnesota, director of the Life Course Center, and an affiliate of the Minnesota Population Center. She studies the adoption and implementation of new workplace policies and the consequences of these innovations for employees, families, and work organizations. Her research on flexibility initiatives, family leaves, childcare benefits, sexual harassment policies... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
avatar for Molly Anderson

Molly Anderson

President, Exponential Talent LLC
Molly Anderson is president of Exponential Talent LLC which specializes in tapping the full performance power of today’s diverse workforce. She is also co-author of the best-seller “The Corporate Lattice: Achieving High Performance in the Changing World of Work.” Previously, Anderson was director of talent for Deloitte Services LP where she led transformative initiatives in the retention and advancement of women... Read More →

Thursday November 7, 2013 2:15pm - 2:45pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:45pm

Panel 1: Why is change so slow?
Why is change so slow?
Changes to the structure and culture of work have lagged behind changes in the composition of the workforce and changes in the nature of work brought about by changing technology. Why has change been so slow?  What are the sources of resistance to organizational change efforts? This panel will examine the resistance to change with the goal of shedding light on how we might move past that more effectively redesign work.    

Panelists
avatar for Beth Axelrod

Beth Axelrod

Senior Vice President, Human Resources, eBay
As eBay Inc.’s Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Beth is responsible for all aspects of the company's human resources capabilities designed to drive performance of the business. These include HR strategy, recruiting, learning and development, compensation, benefits and the continuing evolution of the company's culture and its gender diversity initiative (WIN). Beth also sits on the board of the eBay Foundation, which oversees... Read More →
avatar for Joan C. Williams

Joan C. Williams

Distinguished Professor of Law and Hastings Foundation Chair, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
Joan C. Williams has played a central role in reshaping the debates over women’s advancement for the past quarter-century. Described as having "something approaching rock star status” by The New York Times, Williams was awarded the American Bar Foundation's Outstanding Scholar Award (2012), the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award (2012),   the ABA’s Margaret Brent Award for Women Lawyers of Achievement (2006), and the... Read More →
avatar for Martin N. Davidson

Martin N. Davidson

Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior, University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business
Dr. Martin N. Davidson is Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Business. He teaches, researches, and consults with leaders in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia on how they can use diversity strategically to generate superior business performance. His research appears in Administrative Science Quarterly, Harvard Business Review, Research on Negotiation in... Read More →
avatar for Robin Ely

Robin Ely

Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for Culture and Community, Harvard Business School
Robin Ely is Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for Culture and Community at Harvard Business School.  She conducts research on race and gender relations in organizations with a focus on organizational change, group dynamics, learning, conflict, power, and identity.  Her recent work includes a study of men and masculinity on offshore oil platforms, research on the impact of racial... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
avatar for Mae Tai O'Malley

Mae Tai O'Malley

Founder and Managing Attorney, Paragon Legal
Mae is the founder and managing attorney of Paragon Legal, one of the fastest growing alternative model law firms in the country. Paragon provides senior level attorneys to leading San Francisco bay area companies including Cisco, McKesson, and Apple on a project basis. 85% of the Paragon team are women and minorities. Mae started her career at Morrison & Foerster SF and Tokyo, and moved on to become corporate counsel at Evolve Software... Read More →

Thursday November 7, 2013 2:45pm - 5:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:50pm

Robin Ely, Harvard Business School

Old Habits Die Hard:  Challenging Institutions to Achieve Gender Equity   
When smart, talented, ambitious women fail to thrive in traditionally male jobs, when they derail on their way to companies’ senior-most ranks, we question whether they are truly qualified, whether they are temperamentally fit for such jobs, but we should be questioning whether the criteria companies use to assess qualifications and fit—24/7 availability and a willingness to put job and career ahead of all else—are the right ones.  More than twenty years of research in companies across a range of industries lead me to believe they are not.  Rather, these criteria are bad habits, oppressive relics that still carry the imprint of our history of gender hierarchy.  Until we take a critical look at the organizational cultures that create and sustain these habits, “gender initiatives”— those increasingly popular programs companies undertake to accelerate women’s advancement—will fail.  To promote gender equity, sustainable economic growth, and livable lives for both men and women, we must challenge conventional understandings and practices and engage in wholesale institution-, organization-, and individual-level change.


Panelists
avatar for Robin Ely

Robin Ely

Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for Culture and Community, Harvard Business School
Robin Ely is Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean for Culture and Community at Harvard Business School.  She conducts research on race and gender relations in organizations with a focus on organizational change, group dynamics, learning, conflict, power, and identity.  Her recent work includes a study of men and masculinity on offshore oil platforms, research on the impact of racial... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 2:50pm - 3:10pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

3:10pm

Martin N. Davidson, Darden Graduate School of Business

The Problem of Redesigning and Redefining Work: And That’s Why Change is So Slow
For many companies, the prospect of redefining and redesigning work is experienced as a problem so complex that it creates profound anxiety and inertia. This anxiety stems from the threat to organizational, cultural, and personal values of what constitutes—and who can perform—the work. To mobilize and sustain change, leaders must frame substantive work redesign not as a problem, but as a strategic opportunity that furthers the fundamental purpose of the organization. Such reframing can be difficult since it requires personal and organizational insight and analysis. But once it occurs, opportunities for experimentation emerge that can enhance performance and transform the nature of work.


Panelists
avatar for Martin N. Davidson

Martin N. Davidson

Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior, University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business
Dr. Martin N. Davidson is Professor of Leadership and Organizational Behavior at the University of Virginia’s Darden Graduate School of Business. He teaches, researches, and consults with leaders in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia on how they can use diversity strategically to generate superior business performance. His research appears in Administrative Science Quarterly, Harvard Business Review, Research on Negotiation in... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:10pm - 3:30pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

3:30pm

Joan C. Williams, UC Hastings

Why The Ideal Worker Remains Unchanged 
Only 13.9 percent of American mothers work more than 50 hours a week during the key years of career advancement—which translates into “less than full time” in many high-powered careers. Yet, despite 30 years of sustained effort, the ever-available Ideal Worker remains virtually unchanged and reduced hours options are often marginalized and stigmatized. Why has the traditional “business case for workplace flexibility” failed to persuade? Because what’s at issue is not money, but morality and masculinity. This talk will sketch the outline of how to reframe the debate.   


Panelists
avatar for Joan C. Williams

Joan C. Williams

Distinguished Professor of Law and Hastings Foundation Chair, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
Joan C. Williams has played a central role in reshaping the debates over women’s advancement for the past quarter-century. Described as having "something approaching rock star status” by The New York Times, Williams was awarded the American Bar Foundation's Outstanding Scholar Award (2012), the Elizabeth Hurlock Beckman Award (2012),   the ABA’s Margaret Brent Award for Women Lawyers of Achievement (2006), and the... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:30pm - 3:50pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

3:50pm

Beth Axelrod, eBay

How eBay Inc. Increased Women in Leadership Roles…Now the Hard Work Begins.   
This talk will share the story of eBay Inc’s gender diversity initiative (known as WIN) and its remarkable progress in shifting the gender demographics in just 30 months through leadership commitment,  focus on a few people processes, and measurement.  And yet, the demographic progress seemed ahead of the day-to-day reality.  This talk reflects on why, as well as what’s next for WIN at eBay Inc.


Panelists
avatar for Beth Axelrod

Beth Axelrod

Senior Vice President, Human Resources, eBay
As eBay Inc.’s Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Beth is responsible for all aspects of the company's human resources capabilities designed to drive performance of the business. These include HR strategy, recruiting, learning and development, compensation, benefits and the continuing evolution of the company's culture and its gender diversity initiative (WIN). Beth also sits on the board of the eBay Foundation, which oversees... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 3:50pm - 4:10pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

5:00pm

Interactive Session 1 - Moving Beyond Barriers, led by Carol Tisson

In this interactive session we will take a fresh look at the orthodoxies guiding today's organizational decisions and research. We will examine the ways in which these orthodoxies could be constraining progress, and challenge them in order to come up with the new ideas needed to redesign of work. 


Session Leader
avatar for Carol Tisson

Carol Tisson

Owner, Carol Tisson Consulting
Carol Tisson is a management consultant and coach with over 25 years of experience in organization effectiveness, leadership development and culture change, with clients spanning high tech, healthcare, financial services and nonprofit sectors. She works with leaders at all levels to strengthen their ability to envision new futures, mobilize aligned action, successfully lead change and build organizations in which people thrive. Prior to... Read More →


Thursday November 7, 2013 5:00pm - 6:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

6:00pm

6:45pm

Dinner
Thursday November 7, 2013 6:45pm - 8:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

7:15pm

Remarks from the White House
Making America Work for Working Families
The financial security of hardworking American families is the foundation of a strong and growing economy. That’s why next spring President Obama will convene a White House Summit on Working Families, in partnership with the Center for American Progress and U.S. Department of Labor. The summit builds on the President’s plan to ensure a better bargain for hardworking Americans by elevating the ongoing national conversation about making today’s workplace work for everyone – from working parents struggling to balance the demands of their jobs with the needs of their families, to businesses seeking to attract and retain skilled workers and improve their bottom lines.

Keynote Speakers
avatar for Avra Siegel

Avra Siegel

Deputy Director, The White House Council on Women and Girls
Ms. Siegel was previously at the National Economic Council at the White House, where she led the women and family economic security portfolio. Prior to joining the Administration she worked as an advance person on the 2008 Presidential Campaign. Throughout the course of her personal and professional life Ms. Siegel has been a tireless advocate for women and girls, from laying the foundation for a Women’s Commission in Allegheny County, PA... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
avatar for Beth Garfield

Beth Garfield

Founding Partner, Holguin, Garfield, Martinez & Quinonez
Beth received a B.A. from Stanford in ‘74and law degree from the University of Michigan in ‘77. While at Stanford, she was president of the Associated Students of Stanford and helped to found the Center for Research on Women, now the Clayman Institute for Gender Research. She is a founding partner of Holguin, Garfield, Martinez & Quiñonez, a law firm in Los Angeles specializing in the representation of unions. During her... Read More →

Thursday November 7, 2013 7:15pm - 7:30pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford
 
Friday, November 8
 

8:30am

Breakfast
Friday November 8, 2013 8:30am - 9:00am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

9:00am

Panel 2: What's in it for workplaces?

What's in it for workplaces?
In what way might workplaces benefit from alternative work place structures and practices? How do alternative workplace designs affect productivity, employee health, and workforce engagement? This panel examines workplace design as a means to facilitate innovation and growth in order to build a stronger, more rigorous, business case for organizational change.


Panelists
avatar for Jennifer Allyn

Jennifer Allyn

Managing Director in the Office of Diversity for the US Firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Jennifer Allyn is a Managing Director in the Office of Diversity for the US Firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.  As an executive and thought leader promoting diversity initiatives, she is responsible for designing programs to retain, develop, and advance diverse professionals. Ms. Allyn has been recognized as a subject matter expert on gender, GLBT and work/life challenges.   She is a frequent public speaker and has been quoted... Read More →
avatar for Leslie B. Hammer

Leslie B. Hammer

Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety, and Health, Portland State University
Dr. Leslie B. Hammer is a professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology at Portland State University.  Dr. Hammer is the Director of the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety, and Health, funded by grants from the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. This center is one of six centers that make up the national Work, Family, and Health Network (WFHN... Read More →
avatar for Nicholas Bloom

Nicholas Bloom

Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas (Nick) Bloom is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University, and a Co-Director of the Productivity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on management practices and uncertainty. He previously worked at the UK Treasury and McKinsey & Company. His work has been covered in a range of media including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Financial Times... Read More →
avatar for Susan J. Lambert

Susan J. Lambert

Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago
Susan J. Lambert is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Over the past twenty years, Lambert has conducted a series of studies on employer practices and employment conditions in low-level, hourly jobs with the goal of identifying ways to improve workers’ economic security and ability to fulfill caregiving responsibilities. | | The sites for Lambert’s research span both... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
avatar for Phyllis Stewart Pires

Phyllis Stewart Pires

Director of WorkLife Strategy, Stanford University
As the Director of WorkLife Strategy for Stanford University Phyllis has responsibility for designing and managing programs and services that support the Stanford community in navigating the competing demands of work, study, personal and family lives.  Phyllis came to Stanford with an extensive background in providing pragmatic, comprehensive programs to improve the workplace for working families.  She spent many years designing... Read More →

Friday November 8, 2013 9:00am - 11:15am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

9:05am

Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University

About 10% of US employees now regularly work from home (WFH), but there are concerns this can lead to “shirking from home.” I report the results of a WFH experiment at CTrip, a 16,000- employee, NASDAQ-listed Chinese travel agency. Call center employees who volunteered to WFH were randomly assigned by even/odd birthdate to work from home or in the office for 9 months. Home working led to a 13% performance increase, of which about 9% was from working more minutes per shift (fewer breaks and sick-days) and 4% from more calls per minute (attributed to a quieter working environment). Home workers also reported improved work satisfaction and experienced less turnover, but their promotion rate conditional on performance fell. Due to the success of the experiment, CTrip rolled out the option to WFH to the whole firm and allowed the experimental employees to re-select between the home or office. Interestingly, over half of them switched, which led to the gains from WFH almost doubling to 22%. This highlights the benefits of learning and selection effects when adopting modern management practices like WFH. 


Panelists
avatar for Nicholas Bloom

Nicholas Bloom

Professor of Economics, Stanford University
Nicholas (Nick) Bloom is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University, and a Co-Director of the Productivity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship program at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on management practices and uncertainty. He previously worked at the UK Treasury and McKinsey & Company. His work has been covered in a range of media including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and Financial Times... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 9:05am - 9:25am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

9:25am

Susan J. Lambert, University of Chicago

The business case of implementing employee-friendly alternative work arrangements in low-level jobs: Hope or lost cause? 

Although problems with worker performance abound when job quality is low, in low-level, hourly job, many of today’s employers have severed the link between worker performance and firm profitability, undermining the ‘business case’ for alternative work arrangements that benefit employees, not just the employer.  Because labor costs in hourly jobs are mostly variable, not fixed, employers have an incentive to minimize the use of labor, placing workers at risk of underemployment, unpredictable schedules, and turnover. Variation in work hours is experienced as instability, not flexibility. I consider two strategies to increase incentives for employers to improve the quality of low-level jobs by increasing the fixed costs of labor: requiring employers to guarantee employees a minimum number of hours and to offer the same benefits to all firm employees. Increasing fixed costs could provide the nudge employers need to manage rather than minimize, or externalize, the costs of labor in low-level jobs, In turn providing workers with greater stability, predictability, and meaningful flexibility. 


Panelists
avatar for Susan J. Lambert

Susan J. Lambert

Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago
Susan J. Lambert is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. Over the past twenty years, Lambert has conducted a series of studies on employer practices and employment conditions in low-level, hourly jobs with the goal of identifying ways to improve workers’ economic security and ability to fulfill caregiving responsibilities. | | The sites for Lambert’s research span both... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 9:25am - 9:45am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

9:45am

Leslie B. Hammer, Portland State University

Redesigning Work to Improve the Health of Workers: The Role of Supervisors

Bringing supervisors and managers directly into the dialogue about redesigning and restructuring work is critical, as supervisors are the linking pins/vehicles through which most organizational change initiatives are effectively implemented. I will discuss the workplace and health benefits of supervisor support, and specifically of family supportive supervisor behavior training. I will also address more general workplace supports and their impact on employee health and well-being. Furthermore, I will discuss how changing the workplace environment impacts health and well-being, introducing the concepts of Occupational Health Psychology and Total Worker Health.


Panelists
avatar for Leslie B. Hammer

Leslie B. Hammer

Professor of Psychology and Director of the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety, and Health, Portland State University
Dr. Leslie B. Hammer is a professor of psychology in the Department of Psychology at Portland State University.  Dr. Hammer is the Director of the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety, and Health, funded by grants from the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. This center is one of six centers that make up the national Work, Family, and Health Network (WFHN... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 9:45am - 10:05am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

10:05am

Jennifer Allyn, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Implementing Flexibility:  From Theory to Practice
The business case for flexibility is compelling for professional services firms like PwC.   Turnover is costly and leaders recognize that flexibility is required to retain and advance top talent.  The challenge, however, is how to implement flexibility initiatives consistently in a demanding client service environment. This talk will explore some of the obstacles and opportunities involved with translating flexibility from theory to practice. 


Panelists
avatar for Jennifer Allyn

Jennifer Allyn

Managing Director in the Office of Diversity for the US Firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Jennifer Allyn is a Managing Director in the Office of Diversity for the US Firm of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP.  As an executive and thought leader promoting diversity initiatives, she is responsible for designing programs to retain, develop, and advance diverse professionals. Ms. Allyn has been recognized as a subject matter expert on gender, GLBT and work/life challenges.   She is a frequent public speaker and has been quoted... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 10:05am - 10:25am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

11:15am

Break
Friday November 8, 2013 11:15am - 11:30am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

11:30am

Lunch and Panel 3: What's in it for the workers?

What's in it for the workers?
Over the last half century, the composition of our workforce has undergone tremendous transformation, ushering in a growing mismatch between today’s workforce and today’s workplace. In what way might today’s workforce benefit from new ways of working? This panel examines the benefits of reimagining work for workers, and the potential of these efforts to create workplaces where all workers can thrive. 


Panelists
avatar for Ana Corrales

Ana Corrales

Vice President of Product Operations, Cisco
Ana Corrales is Vice President of Product Operations within Cisco’s Supply Chain Organization.  Ana has responsibility for end-to-end life cycle management for all Cisco branded products (HW and SW), including a heavy emphasis on new product introduction (NPI).  Product Operations is the primary interface to all Cisco business units. Her organization also leads software enablement across the supply chain. Prior to her current... Read More →
avatar for Erin Cech

Erin Cech

Assistant Professor, Rice University
Erin Cech joined the sociology department as an Assistant Professor in 2012. She was recently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University and earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 2011 from the University of California, San Diego.  She earned undergraduate degrees in Electrical Engineering and Sociology from Montana State University. Cech’s research examines the cultural mechanisms of... Read More →
avatar for Laura Carstensen

Laura Carstensen

Professor of Psychology and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr., Professor in Public Policy, Stanford University
Laura L. Carstensen, PhD is Professor of Psychology and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr., Professor in Public Policy at Stanford University, where she is also the Founding Director of the Stanford Center on Longevity.  For more than twenty years her research has been supported by the National Institute on Aging; in 2005 she was honored with a MERIT award which extends this support another decade.  Dr. Carstensen is best known for... Read More →
avatar for Pamela Stone

Pamela Stone

Professor of Sociology, Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York
Pamela Stone is Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  A recipient of numerous grants and fellowships in support of her research, including one at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, she is an expert on women in the workplace and has written widely on such topics as the gender wage gap, pay equity, and the work-family interface.  She has also consulted, provided... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
avatar for Sally Thornton

Sally Thornton

Founder and Chief Curator, Forshay
Sally Thornton is the Founder and Chief Curator of Forshay, a new recruiting firm that provides resources on-demand.  Previously, Thornton co-founded and ran Flexperience, a company that the San Francisco Business Times named a  "Top 100 Fastest Growing Private Companies" in 2010. Thornton supports other female entrepreneurs through her leadership roles at Stanford University’s Clayman Institute for Gender Research, UC... Read More →

Friday November 8, 2013 11:30am - 2:15am
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

12:05pm

Laura Carstensen, Stanford University

Can Longer Working Lives Improve Quality of Life? 
Life expectancy increased by nearly 30 years in the 20th century and, so far, all of the added years have been put in retirement. Not only does this place considerable strain on individuals and societies to fund decades-long retirements, it misses the opportunity to use added years to improve quality of life at all ages. An alternative to longer retirements is longer working lives. Both older workers and parents of young children could benefit enormously from flexible schedules, work from home, and part-time work.


Panelists
avatar for Laura Carstensen

Laura Carstensen

Professor of Psychology and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr., Professor in Public Policy, Stanford University
Laura L. Carstensen, PhD is Professor of Psychology and the Fairleigh S. Dickinson, Jr., Professor in Public Policy at Stanford University, where she is also the Founding Director of the Stanford Center on Longevity.  For more than twenty years her research has been supported by the National Institute on Aging; in 2005 she was honored with a MERIT award which extends this support another decade.  Dr. Carstensen is best known for... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:05pm - 12:25pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

12:25pm

Erin Cech, Rice University

Consequences of Flexibility Stigma among Academic Scientists

Flexibility stigma, or the devaluation of workers who seek flexible work arrangements, is an important barrier to redesigning professional workplaces in the 21st Century.  Drawing on a sample that approaches the cultural norm of “ideal workers”—science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) faculty—I discuss who is most likely to report flexibility stigma in their departmental climates and identify consequences of working in an environment where one perceives this stigma.  Analysis of survey data indicates that faculty who report flexibility stigma in their departments, regardless of their gender or family status, are more likely to want to leave for industry, less likely to intend to remain at their university long-term, report worse work-life balance, and are less satisfied with their jobs. These findings help support a business case for changing workplace cultures and structures to better fit the needs of workers:  flexibility stigma has negative consequences for all STEM faculty who reported this stigma, not just those (such as parents) who are directly at risk of being stigmatized. 


Panelists
avatar for Erin Cech

Erin Cech

Assistant Professor, Rice University
Erin Cech joined the sociology department as an Assistant Professor in 2012. She was recently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University and earned her Ph.D. in Sociology in 2011 from the University of California, San Diego.  She earned undergraduate degrees in Electrical Engineering and Sociology from Montana State University. Cech’s research examines the cultural mechanisms of... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:25pm - 12:45pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

12:45pm

Pamela Stone, Hunter College

What Do Professional Women Want at Work?
This presentation reports on an approximately 10-year follow-up study of professional women who were originally interviewed while out of the labor force and engaged primarily in childcare.  Results at the time of the original interview revealed that these women, all mothers, were unable to realize their preferences for meaningful, flexible professional work, a shortfall that played a major role in their decision to leave the labor force, and that the majority planned to return to work.  Some ten years later, the follow-up reveals that the majority have returned to work, but have significantly redirected away from their former careers.  A comparison of their former jobs with their re-entry jobs reveals realized--and unrealized--preferences and suggests directions for workplace redesign to attract and retain highly skilled professional women.  


Panelists
avatar for Pamela Stone

Pamela Stone

Professor of Sociology, Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York
Pamela Stone is Professor of Sociology at Hunter College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.  A recipient of numerous grants and fellowships in support of her research, including one at the Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, she is an expert on women in the workplace and has written widely on such topics as the gender wage gap, pay equity, and the work-family interface.  She has also consulted, provided... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 12:45pm - 1:05pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

1:05pm

Ana Corrales, Cisco
Own Change
In today's workplace, you can be the recipient of change or you can be the leader of change. Technology can be a catalyst in changing our workplace by meeting people's most basic needs.

Panelists
avatar for Ana Corrales

Ana Corrales

Vice President of Product Operations, Cisco
Ana Corrales is Vice President of Product Operations within Cisco’s Supply Chain Organization.  Ana has responsibility for end-to-end life cycle management for all Cisco branded products (HW and SW), including a heavy emphasis on new product introduction (NPI).  Product Operations is the primary interface to all Cisco business units. Her organization also leads software enablement across the supply chain. Prior to her current... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 1:05pm - 1:25pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:15pm

Break
Friday November 8, 2013 2:15pm - 2:30pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:30pm

Panel 4: Implementing change

Implementing change
How can we create and sustain organizational changes to the structure and culture of work? How can these change benefit both businesses and workers?  This panel will discuss attempts to redesign the structure of work, highlighting both the challenges and the successes. 


Panelists
avatar for Eric Severson

Eric Severson

SVP Global Talent Solutions, Gap Inc.
Eric Severson is Senior Vice President of Global Talent Solutions, responsible for enterprise talent management for Gap Inc.’s 135,000 employees, including strategy, total rewards, technology, performance, engagement, development, organizational effectiveness, and recruitment. He also oversees HR for Gap Inc.’s business in China and the Growth, Innovation and Digital Division. Before entering his current position in 2013, Eric was... Read More →
avatar for Hannah Valantine

Hannah Valantine

Professor of Medicine; Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Leadership, Stanford School of Medicine
Dr. Valantine is a Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and the Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Leadership at Stanford School of Medicine, a leadership position to which she was appointed in November 2004. In this role she has developed innovative approaches to faculty development, leadership and diversity. She is nationally recognized for her transformative approaches to diversity, and is a recipient of the NIH Director’s... Read More →
avatar for Leslie Perlow

Leslie Perlow

Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership in Organizational Behavior, Harvard Business School
Leslie Perlow is the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership in the Organizational Behavior area at the Harvard Business School. She currently teaches Authentic Leadership Development in the MBA program and runs a doctoral seminar on the craft of qualitative inductive research. She recently published a new book, Sleeping with your smartphone: How to break the 24-7 habit and change the way you work.  Professor Perlow’s research... Read More →
avatar for Phyllis Moen

Phyllis Moen

McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair and Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota
Phyllis Moen holds a McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair and is Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota, arriving there in 2003 after twenty-five years as a professor at Cornell University where she held the Ferris Family Chair in Life Course Studies.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1978.  | | Professor Moen co-directs (with Erin Kelly) the Flexible Work and Well-Being Center (located in the... Read More →

Introductory Remarks
avatar for Gina Bianchini

Gina Bianchini

Founder and CEO, Mightybell
Gina Bianchini is an expert in creating communities of interests online and in the real world. She is the founder and CEO of Mightybell, the first community platform built to support networks of groups.  Before Mightybell, Bianchini served as CEO of Ning from its inception in 2004 to March of 2010. Bianchini serves on the board of directors of Scripps Networks Interactive (NYSE: SNI). She also serves on the Advisory Council of the Clayman... Read More →

Friday November 8, 2013 2:30pm - 4:45pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:35pm

Phyllis Moen, University of Minnesota

Reimagining Flexibility: The Case of ROWE at Best Buy

The first rollout of the Results Only Work Environment (ROWE) occurred at Best Buy Headquarters in the Twin Cities area.  I will discuss some of the findings from this quasi-experimental study of new ways of working more flexibly, by focusing on results, not time spent at work or on the job. I will also summarize some of the promise and pitfalls of seeking to sustain such initiatives. 


Panelists
avatar for Phyllis Moen

Phyllis Moen

McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair and Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota
Phyllis Moen holds a McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair and is Professor of Sociology at the University of Minnesota, arriving there in 2003 after twenty-five years as a professor at Cornell University where she held the Ferris Family Chair in Life Course Studies.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1978.  | | Professor Moen co-directs (with Erin Kelly) the Flexible Work and Well-Being Center (located in the... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:35pm - 2:55pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

2:55pm

Leslie Perlow, Harvard Business School

Change the work, not the people: A new approach to creating better work and better lives

The work world has become more global, more technologically advanced and hyper efficient. As a result, work is invading our personal lives. There are many individual practices and organizational policies geared at helping individuals better accommodate the demands of work.  This presentation will focus, in contrast, on how teams can change the work itself to result in more control and predictability for individuals.  The surprising finding: these changes also result in more efficient and effective work outcomes.


Panelists
avatar for Leslie Perlow

Leslie Perlow

Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership in Organizational Behavior, Harvard Business School
Leslie Perlow is the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of Leadership in the Organizational Behavior area at the Harvard Business School. She currently teaches Authentic Leadership Development in the MBA program and runs a doctoral seminar on the craft of qualitative inductive research. She recently published a new book, Sleeping with your smartphone: How to break the 24-7 habit and change the way you work.  Professor Perlow’s research... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 2:55pm - 3:15pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

3:15pm

Hannah Valantine, Stanford School of Medicine

Academic Biomedical Career Customization (ABCC): The Stanford Medicine model to ameliorate work-life and work-work conflicts as an integral part of career development and success.

Work-family conflict remains a serious barrier to the advancement of women in academia (Mason et al, 2013).  At the SoM, work-life integration is one of the top two reasons faculty consider leaving (Sloan Institutional Survey, 2012).  In addition, we have identified work-work conflict (competing demands across missions) as a significant source of faculty stress.  To address this, the SoM developed the Academic Biomedical Customization (ABCC) program to support faculty in addressing their specific work-life and work-work conflicts as an integral part of their career development and success. The ABCC model incorporates two major elements: 1) Customized Career Development: A yearly one-on-one career development conversation between individual faculty and their department chair, supported by coaching and the active provision of information on available institutional resources to support the career development and work-life integration of each faculty. 2) A banking system system for contributions to service.  Implemented at the team level, this recognition system provides concrete support for faculty who engage in service activities. Our ABCC pilot so far has engaged 45 clinical faculty and 7 basic science faculty, with very promising initial results which will be presented.


Panelists
avatar for Hannah Valantine

Hannah Valantine

Professor of Medicine; Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Leadership, Stanford School of Medicine
Dr. Valantine is a Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and the Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Leadership at Stanford School of Medicine, a leadership position to which she was appointed in November 2004. In this role she has developed innovative approaches to faculty development, leadership and diversity. She is nationally recognized for her transformative approaches to diversity, and is a recipient of the NIH Director’s... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:15pm - 3:35pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

3:35pm

Eric Severson, Gap Inc.
The business case for The Results Only Workplace
Having implemented a Results-Only workplace, The Gap experience demonstrates the business value of engaging employees fully, especially in a competitive labor market seeking Generation Y talent. Looking to the future, The Gap is experimenting with new designs to deliver ROWE 3.0 and beyond. 
 

Panelists
avatar for Eric Severson

Eric Severson

SVP Global Talent Solutions, Gap Inc.
Eric Severson is Senior Vice President of Global Talent Solutions, responsible for enterprise talent management for Gap Inc.’s 135,000 employees, including strategy, total rewards, technology, performance, engagement, development, organizational effectiveness, and recruitment. He also oversees HR for Gap Inc.’s business in China and the Growth, Innovation and Digital Division. Before entering his current position in 2013, Eric was... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 3:35pm - 3:55pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

4:45pm

Break
Friday November 8, 2013 4:45pm - 5:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

5:00pm

Interactive Session 2 - Reimagining the Future, led by Carol Tisson

In this working session we will explore the most intriguing ideas for a new research agenda and possible collaborations, and explore what it would take to bring them to fruition.


Session Leader
avatar for Carol Tisson

Carol Tisson

Owner, Carol Tisson Consulting
Carol Tisson is a management consultant and coach with over 25 years of experience in organization effectiveness, leadership development and culture change, with clients spanning high tech, healthcare, financial services and nonprofit sectors. She works with leaders at all levels to strengthen their ability to envision new futures, mobilize aligned action, successfully lead change and build organizations in which people thrive. Prior to... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 5:00pm - 6:00pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

6:00pm

6:45pm

Dinner
Friday November 8, 2013 6:45pm - 7:15pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford

7:15pm

Closing Keynote: Christie Smith, Deloitte Consulting LLP and Kenji Yoshino, NYU School of Law - Reimagining work by uncovering talent

Reimagining Work by Uncovering Talent

Kenji Yoshino, Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at NYU  School of Law and Christie Smith, Managing Principal of the Deloitte University Leadership Center for Inclusion will be presenting findings from their recent whitepaper: Uncovering Talent: A New Model for Inclusion. The paper explores the concept of “covering,” a process through individuals downplay their differences relative to mainstream perceptions. Yoshino and Smith examine covering behaviors across four dimensions: appearance, affiliation, advocacy and association.  Their findings indicate that all populations – not just the historically underrepresented groups – cover at work and that such behaviors negatively impact one’s sense of self and diminishes employees’ commitment to their organizations.  


Keynote Speakers
avatar for Christi Smith

Christi Smith

West Region Managing Director and Leadership Center for Inclusion Managing Principal, Deloitte Consulting LLP
Christie Smith has a track record of breaking boundaries – including her past career as a professional golfer, her leadership in fostering growth of the Life Science sector, and her experience as one of Deloitte’s most senior diversity partners | | Christie has spent the last 24 years consulting, focusing on aligning business strategy with the requirements of organizational structure, talent, leadership development and global... Read More →
avatar for Kenji Yoshino

Kenji Yoshino

Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law, New York University
Kenji Yoshino is the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at NYU School of Law.  He was educated at Harvard (B.A. 1991), Oxford (M.Sc. 1993 as a Rhodes Scholar), and Yale Law School (J.D. 1996).  He taught at Yale Law School from 1998 to 2008, where he served as Deputy Dean (2005-6) and became the inaugural Guido Calabresi Professor in 2006.  His fields are constitutional law, anti-discrimination law, and law... Read More →


Friday November 8, 2013 7:15pm - 8:15pm
McCaw Hall, Stanford Alumni Center 326 Galvez Street, Stanford